Tag Archives: goethe

Kindle Clippings, Young Werther

I decided to figure out how to upload the notes and highlights I made in Sorrows just to see what it’s like. I plugged my Kindle in, opened up the E: drive under My Computer, and there’s a txt file under Documents called “My Clippings”. I opened it up and it contains all the notes and highlights and bookmarks I’ve made on the Kindle! Fabulous! This is too exciting for me! No more retyping favourite quotes again! Oh this Guy is spoiling me…

This is what it looks like for Sorrows:

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The Sorrows of Young Werther (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)
– Highlight Loc. 82-84 | Added on Tuesday, March 03, 2009, 10:32 PM

The human race is but a monotonous affair. Most of them labour the greater part of their time for mere subsistence; and the scanty portion of freedom which remains to them so troubles them that they use every exertion to get rid of it. Oh, the destiny of man!

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The Sorrows of Young Werther (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)
– Highlight Loc. 282-83 | Added on Tuesday, March 03, 2009, 10:51 PM

and O Wilhelm, I vowed at that moment, that a maiden whom I loved, or for whom I felt the slightest attachment, never, never should waltz with any one else but with me, if I went to perdition for it! — you will understand this.

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The Sorrows of Young Werther (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)
– Highlight Loc. 602-9 | Added on Wednesday, March 04, 2009, 10:51 PM

“That is quite another thing,” said Albert; “because a man under the influence of violent passion loses all power of reflection, and is regarded as intoxicated or insane.” “Oh! you people of sound understandings,” I replied, smiling, “are ever ready to exclaim ‘Extravagance, and madness, and intoxication!’ You moral men are so calm and so subdued! You abhor the drunken man, and detest the extravagant; you pass by, like the Levite, and thank God, like the Pharisee, that you are not like one of them. I have been more than once intoxicated, my passions have always bordered on extravagance: I am not ashamed to confess it; for I have learned, by my own experience, that all extraordinary men, who have accomplished great and astonishing actions, have ever been decried by the world as drunken or insane. And in private life, too, is it not intolerable that no one can undertake the execution of a noble or generous deed, without giving rise to the exclamation that the doer is intoxicated or mad? Shame upon you, ye sages!”

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The Sorrows of Young Werther (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)
– Highlight Loc. 804-10 | Added on Thursday, March 05, 2009, 01:48 PM

For we are so constituted by nature, that we are ever prone to compare ourselves with others; and our happiness or misery depends very much on the objects and persons around us. On this account, nothing is more dangerous than solitude: there our imagination, always disposed to rise, taking a new flight on the wings of fancy, pictures to us a chain of beings of whom we seem the most inferior. All things appear greater than they really are, and all seem superior to us. This operation of the mind is quite natural: we so continually feel our own imperfections, and fancy we perceive in others the qualities we do not possess, attributing to them also all that we enjoy ourselves, that by this process we form the idea of a perfect, happy man, — a man, however, who only exists in our own imagination.

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The Sorrows of Young Werther

I’m about in the middle of The Sorrows of Young Werther by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (free at Feedbooks). I swear, Werther is the original emo kid. I’m an awful person and left my poor Guy in my mom’s car so I can’t finish until I get home later and I can’t post any of the quotes that I’d highlighted. I definitely like Sorrows, although I can’t really imagine receiving letters like this and actually… enjoying them.

By the way, I LOVE the highlight function. I used to Post-It the hell out of my books and if I didn’t have any around I’d resort to dog-earing and underlining (with pencil, as much as I can) but that’s just so sad for my books! This way I don’t feel like I’m butchering my books! Also I like being able to type little notes… I remember in the Introduction to Sorrows there’s a reference to Sturm und Drang, which, being as unknowledgeable as I am about German literary and musical movements, I had never heard of before – but I immediately connected it to “Durmstrang” from The Goblet of Fire. Oh, bully for you J.K. for making an oblique literary reference that most of your readers would never catch!